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Posted by on Feb 4, 2020 in MMA |

Midnight Mania! Jones Randomly Drug Tested 42 Times In 2019

Midnight Mania! Jones Randomly Drug Tested 42 Times In 2019

Stephen R. Sylvanie-USA TODAY Sports

Bringing you the weird and wild from the world of MMA each and every weeknight!

Welcome to Midnight Mania!

While it can be difficult at times to keep track of Jon Jones’ numerous controversies in the last decade, the most prevalent in recent years has been frequent drug testing issues. Way back at UFC 182, Jones’ testosterone levels were first noted as suspiciously low. “Bones” was later suspended for tainted supplements in the infamous UFC 200 dick pills incident, which saw him lose his title and sit on the sidelines for a year.

Finally, Jones failed a test in 2017 for turinabol, an anabolic steroid. One would expect this to be clear-cut, but instead, we’re still discussing the consequences of pulses and picograms three years later. In fact, USADA changed their whole policy as a result!

2019 was a marked improvement for “Bones,” his first year with no major controversy in the field of drug testing since all the speculation really heightened in 2015. There were no failed tests, event location changes, or pulsing issues. The fact that he was tested 42 times by three different organizations in that year does give his arguments of innocence a bit more weight. At worst, it implies he’s not using anymore.

Barring any last-second changes, Jones is set to face Dominick Reyes this Saturday (Feb. 8, 2020) at UFC 247 inside Toyota Center in Houston, Texas.

Insomnia

I don’t know if this is real or not, but that’s a gutsy bet if so!

Thanks for the lunch money @Chiefs #SuperBowl #SuperBowlLIV pic.twitter.com/xNpj9MOcEe

— Derek Brunson (@DerekBrunson) February 3, 2020

Man, it really was a good weekend for gambling fighters!

A little jiu-jitsu and wrestling hybrid is always fun:

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Slick split

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Petr Yan is less than concerned about a fight with a “healthy” Dominick Cruz.

Dominick Cruz is nightmare for his physiotherapist, not for me @UrijahFaber @DominickCruz https://t.co/AX2uFJu21F

— Petr “No Mercy” Yan (@PetrYanUFC) February 3, 2020

Coming to you live from the Tony Ferguson Academy of Strength and Conditioning:

Getting stronger and stronger everyday. The grind never stops! #ufc #strengthtraining #teamhybrid #letsgetit pic.twitter.com/BZqB6RVQ2M

— Niko Price (@Nikohybridprice) February 1, 2020

This reaction will really go down as a classic clip. We’ve all been there!

Slips, rips, and KO clips

Former UFC Featherweight Clay Collard picked up a big win in the ring over the weekend — Collard could always be counted on for a brawl!

That’s all she wrote!!

Clay Collard lands the BIG upset against previously unbeaten prospect Ray Guajardo by TKO in Round 2. What a fight!! pic.twitter.com/UGw3mOxpEC

— FOX Sports: PBC (@PBConFOX) February 2, 2020

If you missed the most unpleasant submission in recent memory, there’s still time. You don’t have to click this.

James Gonzalez (6-3) is your new CFFC featherweight champ, rending Pat Sabatini’s arm asunder with shades of Frank Mir’s classic sub on Pete Williams! See the nastiness for yourself. #CFFC81 pic.twitter.com/pSXgBWtgEx

— Kyle Johnson (@VonPreux) February 2, 2020

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Understanding the Mir Lock •••••••••••••••••••• The Mir Lock is a rarely seen armlock submission, this armlock variation was first seen in the early @ufc days when @thefrankmir used this submission to defeat Pete Williams. Thus the armlock became coined “The Mir Lock”. . What joint is being attacked by this rare submission? Short answer is both, long answer is depends. . The Mir lock is a combination of two submissions, americana and armbar. 1️⃣Shoulder: When attacking the shoulder the submission functions by imparting excessive external rotation and imparting a shear force to anterior translate the humeral head in the glenoid fossa. 2️⃣Elbow: While a traditional armbar works by hyperextending the elbow the mir lock works by creating a valgus force on the elbow. The traditional armbar attacks the anterior fibers of the ulnar collateral ligament (UCL), which are strong and thick, while this variation attacks the transverse fibers of the UCL, which are not as strong. . Since it attacks both the shoulder and the elbow, what will get damaged first? Generally the submission targets the weakest link between the two, which is dependent on the opponents biomechanics, joint mobility and how the attacker imparts force. It is also considered an unorthodox submission because it is rarely seen and it can catch an opponent by surprise. . This example was @jitsujames who used the Mir Lock on his opponent to win the @cffcmma featherweight belt. In this case the joint lock dislocated BOTH the shoulder and elbow of his opponent.

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This is quite the size disparity …

Brutal KO. Ricardo Espinoza slumps Julio Mejia in the NFC 55 main event. pic.twitter.com/LcveVBvvxg

— caposa (@Grabaka_Hitman) February 1, 2020

Random Land

They weren’t ready.

Midnight Music: Mysterious Canadian country (loosely) Orville Peck made some waves with his 2019 LP Pony, which I found to be a pretty solid listen!

Sleep well Maniacs! More martial arts madness is always on the way.